Grading Policy

Read this page CAREFULLY. You will be held accountable for its contents.

I do not believe in the bell curve. I believe that if a student does what I ask of them, they deserve a good grade. Every one of my students is eligible for an A in my course. Of course, that does not mean that earning an A is easy or that everyone will get one.

You will NOT receive grades on your writing throughout the semester, with the exception of the final portfolio. I believe that when students focus on a letter or a number, they forget about learning. Plus, I cannot expect you to be doing the same level of writing at the beginning of the semester as you will be doing at the end of the semester, when you have had time to learn more about the craft. It would be unfair for me to judge the early work the same way as the later works. Instead, you will receive feedback that I expect you to consider and address, so that when you get to the final portfolio, you have learned something, and you can present your best work.

The breakdown of grading will be as follows:

  • 70 % contract/quantitative: In this class, grades are based mostly on your ability to complete work according to the criteria assigned, participate in class, and respond to others’ writing. For each assignment, I will give you specific directions, and I will expect each component to be addressed. The most important things I look for when I am considering grades are completion of work according to instructions, reflection, revision, self-assessment and self-evaluation, and a genuine attempt at improving one’s writing.Furthermore, it is important to everyone in the class that everyone has their work done. We do a lot of collaborative tasks, and so we all rely on one another to have done their part.
  • 30% portfolio/qualitative: As a class, we will define a rubric for grading the portfolio. We will develop the criteria throughout the semester by looking at different types of writing and assessing what make “good writing.”

The Contract/Qualitative Grade Outline

To earn an A (90+)…

Attendance: Miss no more than one class. Be on time to class.

Workload:

  • Meet all of the criteria for each assignment.
  • Turn in all major assignment drafts in on time.
  • Turn in no more than 1 late assignment (not including project drafts).
  • Miss no more than 5% of daily tweets.
  • Turn in weekly blog posts.

Conferences: Attend all student-professor conferences.

 

To earn a B (80-89)…

Attendance: Miss no more than one class. Be late no more than a few minutes, no more than 2 times.

Workload:

  • Fail to meet the criteria for no more than 10% of assignments.
  • Turn in all major assignment drafts in on time.
  • Turn in no more than 2 late assignments/ 1 late project draft or 1 small assignment missing.
  • Miss no more than 10% of daily tweets.
  • Miss no more than 1 weekly blog post.

Conferences:  Miss one student-professor conference.

To earn a C (70-79)…

Attendance: Miss no more than one class. Be consistently late to class.

Workload:

  • Fail to meet the criteria for no more than 20% of assignments.
  • Turn in one major assignment final draft late.
  • Turn in no more than 3 late assignments /2 late project drafts or 1 small assignment/draft missing.
  • Miss no more than 30% of daily tweets.
  • Miss no more than 3 weekly blog posts.

Conferences:  Miss more than one student-professor conference.

 

To earn a D (65-69)…

I do not typically give Ds. Odds are that if you aren’t turning in enough work to earn at least a C, you are probably not going to pass.

 

To earn an F (64 or less)…

Attendance: Miss more than one class.

Workload:

  • Fail to meet the criteria for each assignment.
  • Fail to hand in major assignments.
  • Fail to hand in final portfolio.
  • Consistently turn in late work (More than 3 late drafts. More than 4 late assignments).
  • Miss more than 40% of daily tweets.
  • Miss more than 4 weekly blog posts.

Conferences: Fail to attend student-professor conferences.

 

Just so we’re clear….

If you do not abide by the attendance policy, I will not pass you.

If you do not hand in a final draft of each major assignment, I will not pass you.

If you do not hand in a final portfolio, I will not pass you.

There is no amount of crying or foot-stomping that will get me to change my mind. It is not fair to your classmates if you come to class unprepared, and they, therefore, cannot complete their own work or learn what she/he was intended to learn that day.

——————————————————————————————————————–

Note: +/- grades are also given if you fall somewhere between criteria. There is also the possibility for some wiggle room for those who display consistent attendance, demonstrate excellent participation and peer feedback, ask for help when help is genuinely needed, and show a solid work ethic.

I will not give written feedback on drafts that are more than a day late. I also will not give written feedback on drafts that are incomplete (fail to meet criteria). You will have to see me during my office hours if you want to discuss drafts that are extremely late or not meeting the standards.

At midterm time, you will see where you grade is headed. If you are unhappy, that is a good time for you to step up your game. If you are happy, then you know you need to keep up the work. After the midterm, I will offer two extra credit opportunities.

——————————————————————————————————————–

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s